Ukrainian Catholic Church of the Transfiguration

УКРАЇНСЬКA КАТОЛИЦЬКA ЦЕРКВА ПРЕОБРАЖЕННЯ ГОСПОДНЬОГО


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Християнство в Україні та питання православної єдности

Orthodox

До 1169 р. ця ікона знаходилася у Вишгородськім монастирі в Києві. Після плюндровання Києві, Андрій Боголюбський її вкрав і положив в церкву в Владимирі- Суздальському.

Currently in Ukraine, events are unfolding surrounding the Orthodox Church that will have immense implications for Christianity as a whole. Although for some this may seem only a matter between Ukraine and Moscow, it does in fact have a much broader impact.

In order to better understand these issues the next few bulletins will explain the background and the current developments in both Ukrainian and English.

Today’s material is in Ukrainian, it will be in English next week.

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Together we celebrate – together we are God’s people 6 | Разом святкуємо – разом ми Божий люд 6

MatinsMatins, the service of the morning, is the prayer of thanks to God for the new day and the beautiful world in which we find ourselves and through which we can come to know God more fully.

Matins is chiefly made up of psalmody and the “canon”. The canon is a series of verses organized into 9 Odes, which refer either to the day of the week, the saint of the day or to the wonder of God’s creation transfigured in the light of His resurrection.

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Together we celebrate – together we are God’s people 5 | Разом святкуємо – разом ми Божий люд 5

As was mentioned earlier, the Church year is organized around Christ’s Resurrection. Simultaneously the liturgical day is structured around the realization of Christ’s victory over death and sin.

Christianity has maintained the old Jewish notion that the day begins with the setting sun. Why? Because we await the morning of Christ’s Resurrection. Thus the first service of the new day is Vespers; we move from the old day to the new day – the day of Resurrection!

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From our Camino: a monk-pilgrim’s prayer | Із нашого Каміно: молитва монаха-паломника

Though I had crossed all the ways,
crossed mountains and valleys
from East up to West,
If I have not discovered the freedom of being myself
I have gotten to nowhere.

Though I had shared all my goods
with people of another language and culture,
made friendship with pilgrims of thousand paths
or shared lodging with saints and princes
If I am not able to forgive my neighbor tomorrow
I have gotten to nowhere.

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Together we celebrate – together we are God’s people 4 | Разом святкуємо – разом ми Божий люд 4

Living Christ’s Resurrection is the basis of the Divine Liturgy and underpins the entire structure of the liturgical order of the Church. The Church calendar is built around two cycles: movable and immovable feasts.

The first, movable feasts, relates to the most profound moments of divine revelation: time which the Greeks called kairos. The second, fixed or immovable feasts, relates to specific days in history, for example, the Nativity of Christ or the Annunciation. It never changes and so it is straightforward to understand. This time/cycle was regarded as chronos by the Greeks – the root of the word chronological.

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Together we celebrate – together we are God’s people 3 | Разом святкуємо – разом ми Божий люд 3

TogetherWeCelebrate3Every Divine Liturgy (Eucharistic liturgy) is a celebration of and participation in the death and resurrection of Christ. It is important to recall that the death of our Saviour is only the door through which we must go in order to come to the Resurrection: We bow to Your Cross, O Master, and we glorify Your Holy Resurrection!

Christ’s self-sacrifice allows us access to His Resurrection. At the opening of the Divine
Liturgy we stand on the verge of the Resurrection and the celebrant proclaims: Blessed is
the Kingdom of the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit. We are God’s Eucharistic people. This is why the spirit of every Divine Liturgy is joyous and extols
God’s graciousness.

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Together we celebrate – together we are God’s people 2| Разом святкуємо – разом ми Божий люд 2

TogetherWeCelebrate2As early as the first Christian writings of St. Paul, the Christian community has been referred to as the Body of Christ. This is very significant because it immediately brings our attention to two basic elements of Christian life: the Holy Eucharist and our unity in Christ which demands our unity one with another.

The Holy Eucharist is not just about receiving Communion, but rather that we receive because we are a “Eucharistic” people – a community that understands and recognizes God’s graciousness and so gives thanks (eucharistia in Greek). Further the ultimate expression of this graciousness is the victory of love over evil achieved in Christ’s Resurrection.

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Together we celebrate – together we are God’s people 1 | Разом святкуємо – разом ми Божий люд 1

TogetherWeCelebrateWe have now moved into what some call “ordinary” time. In the Church calendar, every week is now calculated in reference to the feast of Pentecost.

From now until the Resurrection, we greet each other with the words: GLORY TO JESUS CHRIST! GLORY FOREVER! We are living in the presence of Christ, united by Christ and our lives reflect the presence and power of Christ. We glorify Christ, not simply in words, but by our very person. We glorify Him because He has become like us; we are invited into the Divine Life.

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Together we celebrate – together we are God’s people | Разом святкуємо – разом ми Божий люд

GodsSpiritThe transition from the celebration of the Resurrection to the period of the Holy Spirit is an appropriate time to consider the meaning and importance of our liturgical practices, and above all the liturgical year.

Intentionally participating in these practices means concretely engaging the life of the entire Church community which does not simply include our parish, but the entire Church, that is those “alive, dead, and yet unborn.”

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